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Contributors to JIATS

This list represents the authors who have contributed article, reviews, or other written pieces to an issue of the Journal of the International Association of Tibetan Studies. To view the contributors for a particular issue or all issues together, click on the appropriate link below.

Matthew Akester is an independent researcher in the field of Tibetan history based in the Himalayan region. Recent publications include Temples of Lhasa (with André Alexander, 2005), and a translation, with introduction, of Memories of Life in Lhasa under Chinese Rule by Tupten Khetsün (2008). He is currently bringing to publication two works on the life and times of Jamyang Khyentsé Wangpo. Matthew has contributed a review to Issue 4 and contributed a review to Issue 5.

Susan Andrews is a PhD candidate in Columbia University’s Department of Religion. Her research focuses on Chinese and Japanese sacred place and pilgrimage traditions, the cults of the bodhisattvas, and the relationship between hagiography and landscape. These subjects converge in the question: How do stories of a religious achiever’s life and relationship to a place contribute to the sense that a site is sacred and merits devotional attention in the form of patronage and pilgrimage? Susan’s dissertation research pursues one answer to this question in the context of the pan-Asian Mount Wutai cult of the bodhisattva Wenshu. Susan has contributed an article to Issue 6.

James Apple is an Assistant Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Calgary. He received his doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His publications include Stairway to Nirvāṇa (2008) and “Redescribing Mandalas: A Test Case in Bodh Gaya, India,” in Introducing Religion: Essays in Honor of Jonathan Z. Smith (2008). His current research interests include early Mahāyāna and topics within Indian and Tibetan Buddhist scholasticism. James has contributed an article to Issue 5.

Kenneth Bauer is an Assistant Professor in Community Development and Applied Economics at the University of Vermont. He earned his doctorate in International Development from the University of Oxford. His recent publications include “On the Politics and the Possibilities of Participatory Mapping and GIS: Using Spatial Technologies to Study Common Property and Land Use Change among Pastoralists in Central Tibet,” in Cultural Geographies (forthcoming) and “Common Property and Power: Insights from a Spatial Analysis of Historical and Contemporary Pasture Boundaries among Pastoralists in Central Tibet,” Journal of Political Ecology (2006). His research concerns livestock- and rangeland-dependent populations in the Himalaya and Central Asia, particularly the impacts of development policies and interventions on the adaptations of pastoralists to their marginal environments. Kenneth has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Beimatsho (padma mtsho) is a doctoral student at Charles Sturt University, Australia. Her recent publications include “Human Ecology and Pasture Resource Management in Tibet,” China Tibetology (2006) and “Women and Gender Studies,” Tibet Women (2006). Her research interests include power flow, social space, economic relationship, and social change in rural Tibetan communities and Tibetan urban societies. Beimatsho has contributed a note from the field to Issue 4.

Christopher Bell is a doctoral candidate in the History of Religions Program at the University of Virginia. His concentration is in Tibetan Religions and History, with a specific interest in Tibetan gods and demons. His recent research focus has been on Tibetan protector deities; he is currently exploring the historical evolution of the cult of Pehar, an ancient and important deity with ties to Tibet’s oldest monastery as well as the government of the Dalai Lamas. Chris has contributed a review to Issue 5.

Patricia Berger is an associate professor in the Department of History of Art, University of California, Berkeley, specializing in later Chinese Buddhist art and exchanges between the Qing court and Tibet and Mongolia. Her most recent book, Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China (2003), won the 2008 Shimada Prize for best book on Asian art. Patricia has contributed an article to Issue 6.

Anne Burchardi is an associate professor at The Tibetan Section of The Asian Department, Institute for Cross Cultural and Regional Studies at University of Copenhagen. She is a research librarian at The Department of Orientalia and Judaica, The Royal Library of Copenhagen. She is currently involved in the Twinning Library Project with The Royal Library and The National Library of Bhutan. Her research interests are Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy and epistemology. She has been an interpreter for Tibetan Lamas since 1981. Further publications by Anne include: "Kongtruls Fem Samlinger - En oversigt" i Fund og Forskning i Det Kongelige Biblioteks Samlinger København: Det Kongelige Bibliotek, 2001. Gaining Certainty about the Provisional and Definitive Meanings in the Three Turnings of the Wheel of Dharma, the Two Truths, and Dependent Arising The Root Text and Commentary, Section Two of Chapter Seven from The Treasury of Knowledge by Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye, (Shes bya kun khyab pp.17-48, Beijing, 1982) with Ari Goldfield. Kathmandu: Marpa Institute for Translation. Anne has contributed an article to Issue 3.

José Cabezón has a Bachelor of Science degree with an emphasis in physics from the California Institute of Technology and a doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was a Buddhist monk in the Tibetan Gelukpa (dge lugs pa) order for almost ten years, living and studying for six years at the Jé (byes) College of Sera Monastery in South India. He is Professor, XIV Dalai Lama Chair in Tibetan Buddhism and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Cabezón is author, editor or translator of seven books and over 30 articles. His books include A Dose of Emptiness (1992), Buddhism, Sexuality and Gender (1992), Buddhism and Language (1994), Tibetan Literature: Studies in Genre (co-edited with R. Jackson, 1996), Scholasticism: Cross-Cultural and Comparative Perspectives (1998), and Identity and the Politics of Scholarship in the Study of Religion (with S. Greeve Davaney 2004). His most recent book, Freedom from Extremes (with Geshe Lobsang Dargyay, Wisdom Publications, forthcoming 2006) is a translation of Go rams pa’s Lta ba’i shan ’byed. His areas of research include Buddhist and comparative philosophy; Tibetan and comparative literary studies; Buddhism and sexuality; Tibetan Buddhist monasticism; Buddhist theology; and theories and methods in the study of religion. His most current research interests include the global commodification of Tibetan Buddhism; Buddhism and sexuality in the classical Indian and Tibetan Buddhist traditions. José has contributed the issue notes to Issue 1.

Marcia Calkowski is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Regina, where she served as head of the department of Anthropology from 1999-2010. Her publications on Tibetan culture cover topics ranging from Tibetan opera performances, “A Day at the Tibetan Opera: Actualized Performance and Spectacular Discourse” (American Ethnologist 18, no. 4, 1991), to the recognition of reincarnate lamas, “Signs of Transition: On Interpreting Some Predictors of Sprul sku Rebirth,” in Buddhism Beyond the Monastery, eds. Sarah Jacoby and Antonio Terrone. She is currently completing a book entitled Refugee Souls: The Recognition of Reincarnate Lamas in Exile. Marcia has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Cathy Cantwell is a Research Officer and Member of the Buddhist Studies Unit at the Oriental Institute, University of Oxford. She has a PhD (1989) from the University of Kent at Canterbury, for a thesis on religious practice at a Tibetan exile monastery in Himachal Pradesh. She is joint author (with Robert Mayer) of Early Tibetan Documents on Phur pa from Dunhuang (2008). Recent research projects have included critical editing of Rnying ma’i rgyud ’bum texts, studies of Dunhuang tantric texts, early Rnying ma tantric traditions, Bon Phur pa texts, and contemporary Bdud ’joms gter ma rituals. Cathy has co-authored an article in Issue 5.

Rémi Chaix is a doctoral student at the École pratique des hautes études (IVth section: Historical and Philological sciences), and member of the Center for Himalayan Studies (CNRS, Paris). His current research focuses on Tibet religious and political history during the eighteenth century, with a specific interest in the kingdom of Sde dge. He recently published an article on the economic history of the Printing House, “Les aspects économiques de l’édition xylographique à l’imprimerie de sde dge (I)”, in Edition, éditions: L’écrit au Tibet, évolution et devenir (2010). Rémi has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Isabelle Charleux is a Senior Researcher at the Institute for Societies, Religions, Secularisms (GSRL) of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), and Lecturer in Chinese Art History and Archaeology at the Sorbonne University (Paris IV) in Paris. She received her doctorate in History of Art and Archaeology from the Sorbonne University in 1998. She is director of the monograph series Nord-Asie (supplement to Études mongoles et sibériennes, centrasiatiques et tibétaines). Her recent publications include Temples et monastères de Mongolie-Intérieure (2006) and “Chinggis Khan: Ancestor, Buddha or Shaman?” (Mongolian Studies 31, 2009). Her research interests include Mongol material culture at the Chinese frontiers, Mongol Buddhist art and pilgrimages. Isabelle has contributed an article to Issue 6.

Geoff Childs is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his doctorate in Anthropology and Central Eurasian Studies from Indiana University. Recent publications include Tibetan Diary: From Birth to Death and Beyond in a Himalayan Valley of Nepal (2004) and Tibetan Transitions: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Fertility, Family Planning, and Demographic Change (2008). Most of his recent work employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies in the comparative study of demographic processes among Tibetans living under vastly different conditions (exiles living in India; indigenous Tibetans of Nubri, Nepal; the historical population of Kyirong, Tibet). He is also interested in the ways that demographic data and analysis are deployed for political purposes. His research centers on demography, relationships between demographic and social changes, and the political dimensions of family planning. Currently, he is investigating how rapid socioeconomic changes impact the family-based system for elderly care in rural Tibet. Geoff has contributed an article to Issue 1, contributed an article to Issue 4, co-authored an article in Issue 4, and co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Wen-shing Chou is an assistant professor of art history at Hunter College, City University of New York. She received her doctorate in History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley in 2011. Her recent publications include “Ineffable Paths: Mapping Wutaishan in Qing Dynasty China,” The Art Bulletin (2007) and “The Visionary Landscape of Wutai Shan in Tibetan Buddhism from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Century” (Ph.D. diss. 2011). Her research interests include the intersection of sacred biography and cartography in Tibetan and Chinese Buddhist visual traditions. She is currently completing a study on the temple restoration projects of the 13th Dalai Lama. Wen-Shing has contributed an article to Issue 6.

I. J. Coghlan is a research fellow at the Monash Asia Institute, Monash University, Melbourne. He received a doctorate in Asian Studies from the School of Social Sciences, La Trobe University in Bundoora (Victoria), Australia. His dissertation (2004) was entitled “The Translation and Introduction to the First Two Chapters of the Mdzod ’grel mngon pa’i rgyan by Mchims ’jam pa’i dbyangs.” I. J. has contributed a review to Issue 1.

Bryan Cuevas is John Priest Associate Professor of Religion at Florida State University. He specializes in Tibetan Buddhism, Tibetan history and culture. His books include The Hidden History of the Tibetan Book of the Dead (Oxford, 2003) and Travels in the Netherworld: Buddhist Popular Narratives of Death and the Afterlife in Tibet (Oxford, 2008), and he is the editor, with Jacqueline I. Stone, of The Buddhist Dead: Practices, Discourses, Representations (Hawai’i, 2007). His current work focuses on Tibetan sorcery and demonology, particularly in relation to the rituals and politics of war from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. Bryan has contributed a review to Issue 3 and contributed a review to Issue 4.

Jacob Dalton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Yale University. He received his doctorate in 2002 in Buddhist Studies from the University of Michigan. His research focuses on developments in tantric ritual in early medieval India and throughout later Tibetan history. After completing his PhD on the history of the Rnying ma school’s Bka’ ma tradition, he worked for three years under a post-doc at the International Dunhuang Project based at the British Library. In addition to a number of recent articles, he is the co-author (with Sam van Schaik) of Tibetan Tantric Manuscripts from Dunhuang (Brill, 2006). He is now working on two books, one on the role of violence in the Tibetan assimilation of Buddhism, and the other on the ritual history of early tantric Buddhism. Jacob has co-authored an article in Issue 3.

Tom Davis is a Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Birmingham, specializing in the bibliography and paleography of English literary documents. In 1974 he began to use his paleographical skills for forensic purposes, and since then has written reports on the handwriting of thousands of suspect documents, given evidence in court many times, from magistrates courts all the way up to the Court of Appeal before the Lord Chief Justice. He has conducted extensive research into the analysis of modern handwriting, including five major research projects funded by the British Home Office. Currently he is engaged in the application of forensic identification practice to the inscriptions on Cuneiform tablets, in a five year project funded by an award from the Leverhulme Trust. Tom has co-authored an article in Issue 3.

Karl Debreczeny is a curator at the Rubin Museum of Art. He received his doctorate in Art History from the University of Chicago. His recent publications include “Sino-Tibetan Synthesis in Ming Dynasty Wall Painting at the Core and Periphery” (The Tibet Journal, 2003); “Dabaojigong and the Regional Tradition of Ming Sino-Tibetan Painting in Lijiang” (in Buddhism between Tibet and China Wisdom, 2009); and “Bodhisattvas South of the Clouds: Situ Panchen’s Activities and Artistic Inspiration in Yunnan” (Patron and Painter, 2009). His current project is an exhibition and catalog titled The Tenth Karmapa: Tibet’s Eccentric Master Revealed (RMA, 2012). Karl has contributed an article to Issue 6contributed an article to Issue 7.

Kelsang Dhondup is a scientist at the Tibet Academy of Agricultural and Animal Sciences in Lhasa. He completed his Masters Degree in Ecology at the University of Tromsø, Norway, in 2007 with a thesis entitled Ecological Correlates of Livestock and Antelope Winter Rangeland Use in the Chang Tang Nature Reserve, Tibet Autonomous Region, China. His research interests include the investigation of livestock, human, and wildlife spatial and habitat use relationships using GIS technology. He is currently working on his doctoral degree through the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Kelsang has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Hildegard Diemberger is Senior Associate in Research, Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit, Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge. She has published extensively on the anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayan regions including When a Woman Becomes a Dynasty: The Samding Dorje Phagmo of Tibet (2007) and, with Pasang Wangdu, has co-authored the translations of the Shel dkar chos 'byung and the dBa' bzhed. Hildegard has contributed a review to Issue 5.

Tsechoe Dorji is a Lecturer at the College of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, Tibet University, located in Bayi County, Tibet Autonomous Region. He completed his masters degree in Ecology at the University of Tromsø, Norway, in 2006 with a thesis entitled A Test of Rangeland Dynamic Theories Using Grazing Gradients in the Aru Basin, Northwestern Chang Tang, Tibet, China. His research interests include livestock husbandry – wildlife interaction, climate change effects and the ecology of plants in relation to livestock on the western Tibetan Plateau rangelands. He is planning to soon begin a doctoral program in Norway on plant ecology and interaction with livestock husbandry on the western Tibetan plateau. Tsechoe has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Brandon Dotson is Lector in Tibetan at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He received a doctorate in Oriental Studies from the University of Oxford. He recently co-edited with Matthew Kapstein Contributions to the Cultural History of Early Tibet (Leiden: Brill, 2007), which contains his long article on early Tibetan law, “Divination and Law in the Tibetan Empire: The Role of Dice in the Legislation of Loans, Interest, Marital Law and Troop Conscription.” He has reinaugurated the Seminar of Young Tibetologists as the International Seminar of Young Tibetologists (ISYT), and convened its first conference in London. He is at present completing an annotated translation of the Old Tibetan Annals, and his work generally focuses on the intersection of history, ritual, and narrative in and around the period of the Tibetan Empire. Brandon has contributed an article to Issue 3.

Georges Dreyfus studied for fifteen years in Tibetan monastic universities in India and was the first European-born recipient of the title of Geshé. He then earned a doctorate in Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at the University of Virginia before joining the faculty of Williams College, where he is a professor in the Department of Religion. His first book, Recognizing Reality: Dharmakīrti’s Philosophy and Its Tibetan Interpretations (Albany: SUNY Press, 1997), deals with the Tibetan reception of Buddhist epistemology. He has also written on Madhyamaka Philosophy, co-editing with Sara McClintock The Svatantrika-Prasangika Distinction (Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2003). His most recent work, The Sound of Two Hands Clapping (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003), reflects in a partly autobiographical mode on the education of Tibetan monks and the intellectual practices that foster this education. Georges has contributed an article to Issue 1.

Johan Elverskog is an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University. He is the author of several articles and four books, including Our Great Qing: The Mongols, Buddhism and the State in Late Imperial China (2006) and The Pearl Rosary: Mongol Historiography in Early Nineteenth-Century Ordos (2007). He is currently working on the social history of Qing Buddhism and Buddhism and Islam in Inner Asia. Johan has contributed an article to Issue 3 and contributed an article to Issue 6.

Franz-Karl Ehrhard is Professor of Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at the University of Munich, Germany. His research work centres on religious and literary traditions in Tibet and the Himalayas. His latest publications include Early Buddhist Block Prints from Mang-yul Gung-thang (Lumbini International Research Institute, 2000), and The Life and Travels of Lo-chen bSod-nams rgya-mtsho (Lumbini International Research Institute, 2002). Franz-Karl has contributed a review to Issue 2.

John Farrington is the conservation science consultant to WWF-China’s Tibet Program. He has an M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. His recent publications include “De-development in Eastern Kyrgyzstan and Persistence of Semi-nomadic Livestock Herding,” Nomadic Peoples 9, no. 1/2 (2005) and “The Impact of Mining Activities on Mongolia’s Protected Areas: A Status Report with Policy Recommendations,” in Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management (2005). He is currently working on a variety of conservation issues ranging from snow leopard protection to watershed management. John has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Andrew Fischer is a Lecturer in Population and Social Policy at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, Netherlands. He earned his PhD in Development Studies from the London School of Economics. His recent publications include State Growth and Social Exclusion in Tibet: Challenges of Recent Economic Growth (2005) and “Population Invasion versus Urban Exclusion in the Tibetan Areas of Western China: Clarifying the Population Debates,” Population and Development Review (December 2008). He focuses on Chinese development strategies in Tibet, researching issues such as poverty, inequality, social exclusion, and social conflict, and how these are affected by patterns of economic growth, modes of social policy, and aid. Andrew has contributed an article to Issue 4.

Joseph Fox is a Senior Associate Professor of Ecology at the University of Tromsø in Norway. He received his doctorate in Wildlife Ecology and Forest Science at the University of Washington, Seattle. His recent publications on human-wildlife interactions in Tibet include Tibetan Antelope Traditional Hunting, Its Relation to Antelope Migration, and its Rapid Transformation in the Western Chang Tang Nature Reserve (Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine Research, in press) and Biodiversity Conservation and Natural Resource Exploitation on Tibet’s Northwestern Chang Tang Highlands (2005). His research interests include large mammal ecology, human-wildlife interaction, and biodiversity conservation in the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau region. Joseph has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Frances Garrett is Associate Professor of Tibetan Studies at the University of Toronto. She received her doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of Virginia in 2004. She is the author of the 2008 book, Religion, Medicine and the Human Embryo in Tibet, as well as articles on various modes of interaction between pre-modern religion and medicine. Her current research considers intersections between tantric practice, ritual and occult knowledge and medical theory, and what these tell us about the processes of institutional and ideological change in Tibet. Frances has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Holly Gayley is a doctoral candidate in Tibetan and Himalayan Studies at Harvard University. She has written an article, “Patterns in the Ritual Dissemination of Padma gling pa’s Treasures,” in Arrow from the Right, A Bow from the Left: Tradition and Change in Bhutan (Brill, forthcoming). Currently, her research focuses on a contemporary treasure revealer couple, Khandro Taré Lhamo (mkha’ ’gro ṭā re lha mo) and Namtrül Jikmé Püntsok (nam sprul ’jigs med phun tshogs), from the Tibetan region of Golok. Holly has contributed a review to Issue 1.

David Germano is a Professor of Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at the University of Virginia. He received his doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 1998, he began an initiative to create a repository of digital resources for Tibetan Studies that has over time developed into the Tibetan and Himalayan Library (THL). He has published “Architecture and Absence in the Secret Tantric History of rDzogs Chen” in The Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies and is co-editor, with Kevin Trainor, of Embodying the Dharma: Buddhist Relic Veneration in Asia (Albany: SUNY Press, 2004). His main research interest is in the Buddhist and Bön traditions of the tenth through fourteenth centuries, situated in their historical context. David has contributed an article to Issue 1 and contributed the issue notes to Issue 2.

Melvyn Goldstein is a Professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Center for Research on Tibet at Case Western Reserve University. He is a social anthropologist specializing in Tibetan society, history, and contemporary politics as well as in anthropology and history, cross-cultural gerontology, population studies, polyandry, cultural ecology and economic development/change. He has published numerous articles, books, dictionaries, and other materials on a wide range of topics related to Tibet. Mel has contributed a review to Issue 5.

David Gray is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University. He received his doctorate in Religion from Columbia University. His recent publications include The Cakrasamvara Tantra: A Study and Annotated Translation (2007) and The Cakrasamvara Tantra: Editions of the Sanskrit and Tibetan Texts (forthcoming). His research interests include the Tibetan reception of the Yoginī Tantras, and he is currently completing a study, translation, and edition of Tsongkhapa’s Illumination of the Hidden Meaning (Sbas don kun gsal) commentary on The Cakrasamvara Tantra. David has contributed an article to Issue 5.

Andreas Gruschke is an independent scholar affiliated with the Collaborative Research Centre “Difference and Integration” (SFB 586), Oriental Institute, Leipzig University. He received an M.A. in Geography, Social Anthropology, and Sinology from the University of Freiburg, Germany. His publications include The Cultural Monuments of Tibet’s Outer Provinces – Amdo (2 vols., 2001) and The Cultural Monuments of Tibet’s Outer Provinces – Kham (to date 2 vols., 2004). Specializing in Tibetan geography and cultural history, he is writing his doctoral thesis on pastoral resources and pastoralist livelihoods in eastern Tibet. Andreas has contributed an article to Issue 4.

Janet Gyatso is Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies at the Divinity School at Harvard University. She received a doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of California at Berkeley. She is co-chair of the Buddhism Section of the American Academy of Religion. She is the author of Apparitions of the Self: The Secret Autobiographies of a Tibetan Visionary (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998), and is editor of In the Mirror of Memory: Reflections on Mindfulness and Remembrance in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism (Albany: SUNY Press, 1992) and Women in Tibet, co-edited with Hanna Havnevik (London and New York: Columbia University Press, 2005). Her current research focuses on medicine, the body, gender, and intersections between science, culture, and religion in 16th-18th century Tibet. Janet has contributed an article to Issue 1 and contributed an article to Issue 2.

The late Yönten Gyatso (1933-2002) was the research advisor for Tibetan Studies, École Pratique des Hautes Études. He received his Diplôme in Tibetan History and Philology from ÉPHÉ and his Geshé degree from Gomang College of Drepung Monastery. He published “Le monastère de Bla-braṅ bkra-šis ’khyil,” in Tibetan Studies: Proceedings of the 4th Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, ed. Helga Uebach and Jampa L. Panglung, 559-66 (Munich: Kommission Für Zentralasiatische Studien, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1988), Brgal lan ’jigs med gdong lnga’i sgra dbyangs: smra nan phas rgol Glang po stong gi klad pa ’gems byed brgal lan ’jigs med gdong lnga’i sgra dbyangs zhes bya ba (New Delhi: Mongolian Lama Gurudeva, 1981), and his Lamrim lectures were published as La grande Voie Graduée vers l’Eveil de l’incomparable Con Kha pa: Une explication orale, tr. Georges Driessens and Marie-Thérèse Paulauski, 2 vols. (Paris: Centre d’Études Tibétaines, 1976). Yönten Gyatso has contributed an article to Issue 2.

Lauran Hartley (PhD, Tibetan Studies, Indiana University, 2003) has taught courses on Tibetan literature at Columbia University and Indiana University. Her publications include several literary translations, as well as articles in the Journal of Asian Studies, Cahiers d’Extrême-Asie, History of Religions, Amdo Tibetans in Transition: Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies (Leiden: Brill, 2002), and Contemporary Tibetan Literary Studies (Leiden: Brill, 2006). Her recent book project Modern Tibetan Literature in Society: A Critical Survey is under review by Duke University Press. While Lauran currently teaches at Rutgers University and serves as consultant and editor for the Latse Contemporary Tibetan Cultural Library in New York City, she will soon assume a full-time position as Tibetan Studies Librarian for the Starr East Asian Library at Columbia University in New York City. Lauran has contributed a review to Issue 3.

Amy Heller is an independent scholar affiliated with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (Paris), “Langues et Cultures de l’Aire Tibétaine” (UMR 8047), where she is a Tibetologist specializing in Tibetan history and philology, working in the field of Tibetan art history and rituals. She received her doctorate in Tibetan history and philology from École Pratique des Hautes Études. Her recent publications include Tibetan Art (Milano: Jaca Books, 1999) and “The Vajravali Mandala of Shalu and Sakya: The Legacy of Buton (1290-1364),” Orientations (May, 2004). Currently she is writing a book on the cultural history of Dolpo as documented in a monastery library’s collection of local historical documents and illuminated manuscripts, 13th-16th century. Amy has contributed an article to Issue 1.

Agnieszka Helman-Ważny is a Visiting Scholar at the Department of Anthropology, Cornell University. She received her doctorate in Art Theory and History from Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland and her master thesis in Paper Conservation from the Faculty of Conservation and Restoration of Works of Art at the Fine Arts Academy in Warsaw, Poland. Her recent publications include Art of Tibetan Traditional Books (2009) and “Local papermaking, paper trade and book-culture promotion in Inner Asia,” IPH Congress Book 17/2008 (2009). She is currently completing a monograph “Archaeology of Tibetan Books.” Her current research interests include manuscriptology, the history of paper and books in Tibet and China. Agnieszka has contributed an article to Issue 5.

Mark Henderson is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Mills College in Oakland, California. He received his doctorate in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley. He has recently published articles in Social Science History, the Journal of Geophysical Research, and, with Emily T. Yeh, in Education About Asia. His current research is related to urbanization and climate change in the United States and China, and he serves on the management committee of the China Historical Geographic Information System project at Harvard University. Mark has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Toni Huber is Professor of Tibetan Studies at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, where he pursues research and teaching on the anthropology and cultural history of Tibetan and closely related Himalayan societies. His research interests include ritual and religion, social practices and attitudes relating to the natural environment, the ethnography of Tibeto-Burman speaking populations of the far eastern Himalaya, and aspects of development and change in modern Tibetan societies. His most recent monograph is The Holy Land Reborn: Pilgrimage and the Tibetan Reinvention of Buddhist India (Forthcoming, University of Chicago Press). He is currently preparing monographs for publication on hunting in Tibetan societies and an ethnography of the Mra, an undocumented Tibeto-Burman highland population. Toni has contributed an article to Issue 2 and contributed a critical-edition to Issue 2.

Lilian Iselin is working on her doctorate in Central Asian Studies at the Institute of Religious Studies, University of Berne. Concurrently she also works for the Department of International Cooperation of the Swiss Red Cross. She completed her Masters Degree in Social Anthropology at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London in 2004 with a thesis entitled: “Smart Nomads? Modern Education and the Construction of Drokwa Identity on the Tibetan Plateau.” Her current research interests include social transformations of Tibetan pastoralist societies, with a special focus on the relationship between urbanization and modernization and its impact on social space. Lilian has contributed an article to Issue 6.

David Jackson is Professor of Tibetan in the Asia and Africa Institute of the University of Hamburg. He received his doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of Washington. His books include A Saint in Seattle (Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2003); A History of Tibetan Painting: The Great Painters and Their Traditions (Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1996); and Enlightenment by a Single Means (Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1994). His current research interests include the history of religious lineages and their representations in paintings. David has contributed an article to Issue 1.

Roger Jackson is Stephen R. Lewis, Jr. professor of Religion and the Liberal Arts at Carleton College. He received his doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His recent publications include Tantric Treasures: Three Collections of Mystical Verse from Buddhist India (2004) and (as editor and co-translator) The Crystal Mirror of Philosophical Systems: A Tibetan Study of Asian Religious Thought (2009). He is currently working on a book entitled Opening the Great Seal: Mahāmudrā in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. Roger has contributed an article to Issue 2 and contributed an article to Issue 5.

Christian Jahoda is a Researcher at the Social Anthropology Research Unit of the Centre for Studies in Asian Cultures and Social Anthropology, Austrian Academy of Sciences. He received a doctorate in Social and Cultural Anthropology from the University of Vienna. He is coeditor (together with Deborah Klimburg-Salter and Kurt Tropper) of Text, Image and Song in Transdisciplinary Dialogue (Proceedings of the Tenth Seminar of the IATS, 2003, vol. 10/7 [2007]) and author of several articles on the oral traditions, cult of tutelary deities and socio-economic organization in the Western Himalayas and Western Tibet. His current research focuses on oral and festival traditions in Western Tibet. Christian has contributed an article to Issue 4.

Matthew Kapstein holds degrees in Sanskrit from the University of California at Berkeley and in Philosophy from Brown University. He is at present Director of Tibetan Religious Studies at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (Paris) and Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Chicago. He has published numerous articles in the fields of Tibetan and Indian Buddhist Studies and his books include The Tibetan Assimilation of Buddhism (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), and, most recently, The Presence of Light (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004). With the anthropologist Melvyn Goldstein, he was also editor of Buddhism in Contemporary Tibet (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998). Among his present projects are The Tibetans: A General Introduction to Tibetan Studies, to be published by Blackwell, and Buddhism Between Tibet and China, a collaborative work that explores the history of Sino-Tibetan religious relations from the Tang dynasty to the present day. Matthew has contributed an article to Issue 1.

Ulrich Kragh is a research fellow at Leiden University in the Netherlands. He received his doctorate in Tibetan Studies from Copenhagen University in 2004. His recent publications include “Prolegomenon to the Six Doctrines of Nā ro pa – Authority and Tradition,” in Mahāmudrā and the Bka’ brgyud Tradition, PIATS 2006 (IITBS 2011) and and “Appropriation and Assertion of the Female Self (Materials for the Study of the Female Tantric Master Lakṣmī of Uḍḍiyāna)” in Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion (2011, vol. 27.2). His research interests include the early Dags po Bka’ brgyud community, Indo-Tibetan philosophy, and female-authored Indian Tantric texts. Ulrich has contributed an article to Issue 5contributed an article to Issue 7.

Bruno Lainé is a research fellow in the project “Tibetan Manuscripts” of the research network “The Cultural History of the Western Himalaya from the 8th Century” (www.univie.ac.at/chwh) of the University of Vienna. His research focuses on the history and transmission of the Buddhist canonical literature in western Tibet. Bruno has contributed an article to Issue 5.

Tanzen Lhundup is a Professor and the deputy director of the Institute of Social and Economic Studies with the China Tibetology Research Center (CTRC). He received his doctorate from Beijing University’s Sociology Department. His recent publications include A Green Paper on Housing and Rural Development Projects in Tibet (May, 2008). His research interests include social transformation and social development in Tibet. Tanzen Lhundup has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Nancy Lin is an assistant professor of religious studies at Vanderbilt University, specializing in Buddhist traditions of South Asia. She received her doctorate in Buddhist Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Her recent work includes “Adapting the Buddha’s Biographies: A Cultural History of the Wish-Fulfilling Vine in Tibet, Seventeenth to Eighteenth Centuries” (Ph.D. diss., 2011) and “Döndrup Gyel and the Remaking of the Tibetan Ramayana,” in Modern Tibetan Literature and Social Change (2008). Her current research focuses on intersections of monastic and courtly culture in Tibet, particularly through Buddhist hagiographical literature and art. Nancy has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Ma Rong is a Professor in the Institute of Sociology and Anthropology, Peking University. He received his doctorate in sociology from Brown University in 1987. He has published a number of papers on Tibetan studies on population, migration and economy, including “Han and Tibetan Residential Patterns in Lhasa,” The China Quarterly (November, 1991). His book Population and Society in Contemporary Tibet was published in 1996 in Chinese, with an English version forthcoming (Hong Kong University Press). His research interests include population changes, migration, bilingual education, rural development, and grassland communities in ethnic minority regions of China including Tibet, Xinjiang, and Inner Mongolia. Ma Rong has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Klaus-Dieter Mathes is a Professor of Tibetology and Buddhist Studies at the University of Vienna, Austria. His research in progress deals with the Indian origins of Tibetan Mahāmudrā traditions. He obtained a PhD from Marburg University (Germany) with a study of one of the five treatises of Maitreya, the Dharmadharmatāvibhāga (a subtle analysis of the distinction made between the ordinary phenomenal world and the true nature of these phenomena). Klaus-Dieter has contributed an article to Issue 5.

Robert Mayer is University Research Lecturer in the Oriental Studies Faculty of the University of Oxford, where he has been since 2002. He largely works with his wife, Dr. Cathy Cantwell, who like Robert is also on the Oriental Studies Faculty of Oxford University. Prior to that he has held teaching posts at the University of Wales, the Humboldt University of Berlin, and the University of Kent. He gained his PhD from the University of Leiden in 1996. His most recent publication with Cathy Cantwell is Early Tibetan Documents on Phur pa from Dunhuang (2008). Robert has contributed an article to Issue 3 and co-authored an article in Issue 5.

Jan Magnusson is a Lecturer in Social Work at Lund University. He received his doctorate in Social Work from Lund University. His recent publications include “The Baltistan Movement: Tibetan History and Identity in the Northern Areas of Pakistan” in Tibetan Identity and Change: Along the Margins (2006), and “A Myth of Tibet: Reverse Orientalism and Soft Power,” in Tibet, Self, and the Tibetan Diaspora (2002). Jan has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Arthur McKeown is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies at Harvard University. His research interests include early Tibetan history, biography, and linguistic anthropology. He is currently working on a diplomatic edition of a thirteenth-century Pramāṇasamuccaya commentary. Arthur has contributed a review to Issue 1.

Susan Meinheit is Area Specialist for Tibet and Mongolia in the Asian Division, Library of Congress. She holds a Masters of Science in Library Science from The Catholic University of America. Her work focuses on developing and providing access to the Library’s extensive Tibetan and Mongolian collections. Recent articles and publications include: “A New Handlist of Tibetan Rare Book Collections in the Library of Congress,” PIATS X (2003); “The Tibetan and Mongolian Collections in the Asian Division,” JEAL, No. 139 (June 2006); and “The Rockhill Tibetan Collection at the Library of Congress,” PIATS XI (2006). Susan has contributed an article to Issue 5 and contributed an article to Issue 6.

Martin Mills is Senior Lecturer in the Anthropology of Religion at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, and co-director of the Scottish Centre for Himalayan Research. He obtained his doctorate in Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh in 1997. He is author of Identity, Ritual and State in Tibetan Buddhism: The Foundations of Authority in Gelukpa Monasticism (RoutledgeCurzon, 2003). His research interests include: Tibetan monasticism and government; Buddhist ritual and geomancy; and anthropological theories of religion. He can be contacted at m.a.mills@abdn.ac.uk. Further Publications by Martin Mills: "Vajra-Brother, Vajra-Sister: Renunciation, Individualism and the Household in Tibetan Buddhist Monasticism". Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 6(1); ISSN: 0025-1496, 2000. "Living in Time’s Shadow: Pollution, Purification and Fractured Temporalities in Buddhist Ladakh". In Mills, D. and W. Young (eds.) Qualities of Time: Temporal Dimensions of Social Form and Human Experience. (ASA 2002 Monograph). Berg, 2005. Martin has contributed an article to Issue 3.

Anna Morcom is RCUK Academic Fellow in the Music Department at Royal Holloway College, University of London. Her research interests are eclectic, but center around music/dance in the context of a rapidly changing modern world, looking at issues of politics, nationalism, gender/sexuality, economic development/marginalization, migration/globalization, and media. Her regional focus is Tibet and India, looking at the modernization or change under “modernity” of “traditional” Tibetan music and dance as well as new and “popular” styles. In India, she is currently working on a project on gender/sexuality, morality and reform of “Bollywood” dance in contemporary Indian society and the transnational Indian diaspora, examining both new middle class contexts and the world of traditional dancing communities. Her publications include Hindi film songs and the cinema (forthcoming, 2007) and “An understanding between Hollywood and Bollywood? The meaning of Hollywood-style music in Hindi films” in Music and meaning, special issue of British Journal of Ethnomusicology (vol. 10 part 1, 2001): 63-84. She is also involved practically in the world of Tibetan music, having released a first album of Amdo Dunglen songs with co-singer Tanzin in 2006, “Trin Gyi Metok.” Anna has contributed an article to Issue 3.

Subramanya Nagarajarao is a faculty member at the University of Mysore. He received his doctorate in Political Science based on his PhD thesis on the Tibetan refugees in Mysore District, Karnataka, India. His publications include Human Rights and Refugees (about Tibetan refugees in India, 2004). At present he is conducting research on the socio-economic history of south Indian Tibetans. Subramanya has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Paul Nietupski is a professor of Asian religions at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio. He received his doctorate from Columbia University. His recent publications include “The ‘Reverend Chinese’ (rgya nag pa tshang) at Labrang Monastery,” in Buddhism Between Tibet and China (2009) and “Labrang Monastery: Tibetan Buddhism on the Sino-Tibetan Frontier,” Blackwell Religion Compass (2008). His research interests include Amdo studies and medieval Buddhism in India and Tibet. He is currently working on a book on the social and political history of the Labrang Monastery community. Paul has contributed an article to Issue 5 and contributed an article to Issue 6.

Giacomella Orofino is an associate professor of Tibetan Studies at the University of Naples “L’Orientale.” She received her Diploma of Specialization (PhD) in Oriental Studies at the Scuola Orientale of the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Rome “La Sapienza” in 1985. She is co-founder of the NGO ASIA, which operates in support of the preservation of the identity and cultural heritage of the peoples of the Himalayan regions, and she is president of the Center for Buddhist Studies, which promotes the knowledge of Buddhist philosophy, literature, art, and culture in an interdisciplinary perspective. Her recent publications include “The Mental Afflictions and the Nature of the Supreme Immutable Wisdom in the Sekoddeśa and Its Commentary by Nāropā,” in As Long as the Space Endures: Essay on the Kālacakra Tantra in Honor of H.H. the Dalai Lama (2009) and “The Long Voyage of a Trickster Story from Ancient Greece to Tibet,” AION (2011). She is currently working on a monograph on “Eros and Thanatos” in Tibetan Buddhism. Giacomella has contributed a review to Issue 7.

Bryan Phillips is director at Common Ground Healing Arts in Charlottesville, Virginia. He received his PhD in the History of Religions with a specialization in Indo-Tibetan Buddhism from the University of Virginia in 2004, and has taught both the philosophical and practice traditions of Buddhist contemplation for more than a decade. His scholarship examines the biographies and teaching lineages of twelfth- and thirteenth-century Nyingmapa Treasure recoverers, with a special focus on the interface between Tibetan teachings on mantra, compassion, and innate intelligence and contemporary scientific explorations of coherent brain states, psychoacoustics and neurocardiology. Bryan has contributed a review to Issue 2 and contributed an article to Issue 7.

Alyson Prude is a doctoral student at the University of California Santa Barbara. Her Masters thesis was entitled “Celibate Women, Empty Gompas: Leadership, History, Education and the Status of Buddhist Nunneries in Nepal.” Her present research focuses on Tibetan ethnography, and on contemporary religious expression in Tibet. Alyson has contributed a review to Issue 1.

Camille Richard worked for five years as the Rangeland Management Program Coordinator for the International Center for Mountain Research and Development (ICIMOD) in Kathmandu, Nepal, and four years as a rangeland consultant in Tibet and Mongolia. She is currently the coordinator for a conservation NGO in Colorado, USA. Her recent publications (with other authors) include “The Paradox of the Individual Household Responsibility System in the Grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau, China,” USDA Rocky Mountains Research Station Proceedings RMRS-P-39 (2006) and “Community-based Grassland Management in Western China: Rationale, Pilot Project Experience and Policy Implications,” Mountain Research and Development (2003). Camille has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Jann Ronis earned his Ph.D. in religious studies from the University of Virginia in 2009 and is a scholar of Tibetan Buddhism and history. He is a specialist in the religious history of Degé in Kham, eastern Tibet, and has conducted fieldwork in the region multiple times. His current book project examines the scholastics, liturgical programs, and ethics of the Nyingma monasteries in Degé in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and he has published several articles on important figures from this time period. Jann is currently (2011-2013) the Shinjo-Ito Postdoctoral Fellow in Buddhist Studies at University of California, Berkeley. Jann has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Kurtis Schaeffer is a Professor of Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at the University of Virginia. He earned his doctorate in Tibetan and South Asian Religions from Harvard University. His publications include Himalayan Hermitess: The Life of a Tibetan Buddhist Nun (2004) and Dreaming the Great Brahmin: Tibetan Traditions of a Buddhist Poet Saint (2005). He is also the editor of Among Tibetan Texts: Essays on Tibetan Religion, Literature, and History by E. Gene Smith (2001). Kurtis has contributed a review to Issue 1, contributed an article to Issue 6, and contributed an article to Issue 7.

Mona Schrempf is a research fellow in the collaborative research centre “Representations of Social Order and Change” at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. She is affiliated with the Central Asian Seminar of the Institute for Asian and African Studies of Humboldt University and with the South Asia Institute in Heidelberg where she also part-time teaches courses on the anthropology of Tibetan and Asian medicine. She has organized a conference (Central Asian Seminar, Humboldt University Berlin, 2005) and several panels (IATS 10 in Oxford, 2003; IATS 11 in Bonn, 2006; Education Forum for Asia in Beijing, 2005) on this topic. Since 2002, her research focuses on the present and past transmission of Tibetan medicine, public health, and social change in Tibetan areas of China. She received her doctorate in Anthropology from the Free University of Berlin in 2001. Her dissertation research focused on the post-1980 revival of monastic and popular ritual in an Amdo Tibetan community, including monastic and oral history research. Mona has contributed an article to Issue 2.

Elliot Sperling is an associate professor of Tibetan Studies in the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University. He received his doctorate in Tibetan Studies from Indiana University. His recent publications include “圖伯特、Tibet 與命名的力量” [Tubote, Tibet, and the Power of Naming], in Authenticating Tibet [Chinese Version] (2011); “The Tibet Conundrum in Sino-Indian Ties,” in The Rise of China – Implications for India (2011); and “Some Preliminary Remarks on the Influx of New World Silver into Tibet During China’s ‘Silver Century’ (1550-1650),” in The Earth Ox Papers, The Tibet Journal 34, no. 3 – 35, no. 2 (2010). His research interests center around Tibet’s history and Sino-Tibetan relations. Elliot has contributed an article to Issue 6contributed an article to Issue 7.

Michael Sweet is an independent scholar and clinical assistant professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received doctorates in Buddhist Studies and Psychology, both from UW-Madison. His most recent publications include “An Unpublished Letter in Portuguese of Father Ippolito Desideri S. J.,” in Archivum Historicum Societatis Iesu, no. 157 (2010): 29-44; and “Jesus the World-Protector: Eighteenth Century Tibetan Historians View Christianity,” in Buddhist-Christian Studies 26 (2006): 171-76. He has recently completed an unabridged translation and study of Desideri’s Historical Notices of Tibet (with Leonard Zwilling, editor): Mission to Tibet: The Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Account of Father Ippolito Desideri S. J. (2010). Michael has contributed an article to Issue 2 and contributed a review to Issue 5.

Alice Travers is a doctoral student in social history at the University of Paris X-Nanterre and the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales, Paris. Her research concerns the aristocracy of central Tibet during the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth century. Her thesis is based on British archives, autobiographies written by Tibetan noblemen and women, and interviews with members of the aristocracy who witnessed the period under scrutiny, for which she has conducted fieldwork in Tibet, India, Europe, and the United States. Alice has contributed an article to Issue 4.

Dawa Tsering is a researcher with the Tibet Academy of Social Sciences and the director of WWF-China’s Tibet Program. He holds an MA in Anthropology from Case Western Reserve University. His recent publications include Competition and Coexistence: Human-Wildlife Conflict in the Chang Tang Region of Tibet (2007) and Tibetan Traditional Culture and Nature Conservation (2005). He works on a variety of ecological and cultural conservation issues in Tibet particularly with respect to wildlife and nomadic livestock herders in northern Tibet’s Jangtang National Nature Reserve. Dawa Tsering has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Tashi Tsering is the director of the Amnye Machen Institute, Centre for Advanced Tibetan Studies, Dharamshala. He passed the seventh grade at the Central School for Tibetans, Dalhousie, Himachal Pradesh, India. His recent publications include “Sngon ’gro’i gtam gleng gangs la nyi shar” in Mdo khams dge ’brong lo rgyus deb ther lci zla’i zegs ma (2012), “Spar skrun gsal bshad dang ’brel ba’i mtshams sbyor gyi gtam gleng tshig gsum” in Gso rig khog 'bubs drang srong kun tu dgyes pa’i rol mo (2012), and “МОНГОЛ, ТУВДИЙН 1913 ОНЫ 1 ДУГЭЭР САРД БАЙГУУЛСАН ГЭРЭЭ” in МОНГОЛ, ТУВДИЙН 1913 ОНЫ ГЭРЭЭ - ОЛОН УЛСЫН ЭРХ ЗУЙН БАРИМТ БИЧИГ (2012). His research interests include topics on Tibetan history and literature, and he is currently working on a forthcoming book entitled ’Phags yul hi ma cal maṇḍi’i rdzong khongs ri wal sar de bzhin slob dpon chen pos me dpung mtsho ru bsgyur pa’i gnas za hor mtsho pad ma can du ngos ’dzin pa’i brgyud rim rags tsam bkod pa dad pa’i myu gu gso ba’i gru char, the antiquity, history, and evolution of a Tibetan Buddhist pilgrimage place. Tashi has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Gray Tuttle, Leila Hadley Luce Assistant Professor of Modern Tibetan Studies, received his PhD in Inner Asian Studies from Harvard University in 2002. His publications include Tibetan Buddhists in the Making of Modern China (2005). He studies the history of twentieth-century Sino-Tibetan relations as well as Tibet’s relations with the China-based Manchu Qing empire. His current research project focuses on the history and growth of Tibetan Buddhist institutions in Amdo (northeastern Tibet) from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, with special attention to the influences from Lhasa and Beijing as well as the development of local identity. Gray has contributed an article to Issue 2, contributed a review to Issue 2, and contributed an article to Issue 6.

Leonard van der Kuijp completed his PhD at Hamburg University, worked for five years in Nepal, and taught at the Free University of Berlin and the University of Washington in Seattle. Since 1995, he has been a Professor of Tibetan and Himalayan Studies at Harvard University. His research focuses on Indo-Tibetan Buddhist intellectual history and Tibetan-Mongol relations during the Yuan dynasty. Leonard has contributed an article to Issue 2 and contributed an article to Issue 5.

Sam van Schaik is a Senior Researcher for the International Dunhuang Project at the British Library. He received his doctorate in 2000 in Buddhist Studies from the University of Manchester. Recent publications include a number of articles and two books: Approaching the Great Perfection: Simultaneous and Gradual Methods of Dzogchen Practice in the Longchen Nyingtig (Wisdom, 2003), and (co-authored with Jacob Dalton) Tibetan Tantric Manuscripts from Dunhuang (Brill, 2006). He is currently engaged in a five-year project sponsored by the Leverhulme Trust on the palaeography of the Tibetan and Chinese manuscripts from Dunhuang. Sam has co-authored an article in Issue 3, contributed an article to Issue 4, and contributed a review to Issue 6.

Stacey Van Vleet is a masters candidate in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. She also received an M.A. in Anthropology at the University of Colorado at Boulder and studied for two years at Tibet University in Lhasa. Her masters thesis was entitled “The ‘Righteous Power’ of Modern Tibetan Music within the PRC.” Her current studies focus on the cultural history of Tibetan medicine. Stacey has contributed a review to Issue 2.

Peter Verhagen is an associate professor of Tibetan Studies at the Leiden Institute of Area Studies, Leiden University. He received his doctorate in Arts from Leiden University. His recent publications include History of Sanskrit Grammatical Literature in Tibet 2: Assimilation into Indigenous Scholarship (2001) and two series of articles, “Studies in Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Hermeneutics” and “Notes Apropos to the Oeuvre of Si tu paṇ chen chos kyi ’byung gnas (1699?-1774).” His current research interests include the life and times of Si tu paṇ chen chos kyi ’byung gnas, and the various aspects of text-oriented, philological culture in Tibetan Buddhism. Peter has contributed an article to Issue 7.

Cameron Warner is an assistant professor in the Department Culture and Society at Aarhus University. He received his doctorate in Sanskrit and Indian Studies from Harvard University. His recent publications include “A Miscarriage of History: Wencheng Gongzhu and Sino-Tibetan Historiography,” Inner Asia 14, no. 2 (2012) and “Re/crowning the Jowo Śākyamuni: Texts, Photographs, and Memories,” History of Religions 51, no. 1 (2011). His research interests include religion, politics and material culture in the Himalayas. He is currently finishing a book manuscript on the cult of the Jowo Śākyamuni, and beginning a project on religion and migration in Nepal with emphasis on political stability, democracy, and rights. Cameron has contributed a review to Issue 6.

Christian Wedemeyer is Assistant Professor of the History of Religions at the University of Chicago Divinity School. He received his PhD with Distinction in Religion from Columbia University. His publications include Āryadeva’s Lamp that Integrates the Practices (Caryāmelāpakapradīpa) (2007); Tibetan Buddhist Literature and Praxis (with Ronald M. Davidson, 2006); and Hermeneutics, Politics, and the History of Religions: The Contested Legacies of Joachim Wach and Mircea Eliade (with Wendy Doniger; Oxford, forthcoming). He is currently working on a book on rhetoric in the historiography and interpretation of Indian esoteric Buddhism. Christian has contributed an article to Issue 5.

David White is a Professor of Religion at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He received his doctorate in the History of Religions from the University of Chicago. His works include Kiss of the Yoginī: Tantric Sex in Its South Asian Contexts (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003) and The Alchemical Body: Siddha Traditions in Medieval India (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996); and he is the editor of Tantra in Practice (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000). His current research interests include the pan-Asian cult of Bhairava, the “horrific” lord of spirits of Hindus, Buddhists, Jains, Sikhs, and Muslims; planned research includes a subversive history of South Asian polytheism, in which worship without devotion is highlighted; critical translations of Kaula Tantras based on manuscript sources; a book on the Indo-European symbolism of “binding” in legal, medical, and mythological traditions. David has contributed a review-essay to Issue 1.

Daniel Winkler is a free-lance researcher/consultant specializing in the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalayas. He received his MS (Diplom Geograph) from Freie Universität Berlin. His publications include “Yartsa Gunbu – Economy, Ecology & Ethnomycology of a Fungus Endemic to the Tibetan Plateau,” in Wildlife and Plants in Traditional and Modern Tibet: Conceptions, Exploitation and Conservation (2005) and “Yartsa Gunbu (Cordyceps sinensis) and the Fungal Commodification of Tibet’s Rural Economy,” Economic Botany 62, no. 3 (2008). His research interests include traditional use of forests and rangelands and the present transformation of such use, and the role of natural resource management in securing income for rural communities (special focus on Tibet’s fungal and botanical resources). Daniel has contributed an article to Issue 4.

Ciren Yangzong is a Lecturer in the Department of Geography at Tibet University in Lhasa. She completed her Masters Degree in Indigenous Studies at the University of Tromsø, Norway in 2006 with a thesis entitled, “The Household Responsibility Contract System and the Question of Grassland Protection, A Case Study from the Chang Tang, Northwest Tibet Autonomous Region.” Her research interests include development issues in Tibet and she is currently working on a multidisciplinary research project on nomadic pastoralist health issues in the Tibet Autonomous Region. Ciren Yangzong has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Emily Yeh is an Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She received her PhD from the Energy and Resources Group at UC Berkeley. Her dissertation, entitled Taming the Tibetan Landscape: Transformations of Agricultural Land and Labor, is an ethnographic and historical study of development and agriculture around Lhasa, with a focus on greenhouse vegetable farming in the period of economic reform. Recent publications include “Tibetan Indigeneity: Translations, Resemblances and Uptake,” in Indigenous Experience Today (2007) and “Modernity, Memory and Agricultural Modernization in Central Tibet, 1950-1980,” in Tibetan Modernities (2008). Her research focuses on nature-society relationships in Tibetan areas of China, including projects on conflicts over access to resources, environmental history, the political economy of development and environmental governance, and a new project on the emergence of Tibetan environmental subjectivities. Projects she has pursued include mushroom harvesting and conflicts over property rights in forests in Kham (Yunnan); grassland conflict resolution and state incorporation in Amdo (mostly Qinghai); and the cultural politics of identity and difference in the Tibetan diaspora. Emily has co-authored an article in Issue 4.

Serinity Young is a Research Associate in the Division of Anthropology of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. She got her PhD from Columbia University and is the author of Dreaming in the Lotus: Buddhist Dream Narrative, Imagery and Practice (Wisdom, 1999) and Courtesans and Tantric Consorts: Sexualities In Buddhist Narrative, Iconography, and Ritual (Routledge, 2004). Serinity has contributed a review to Issue 3.