Tibetan and Himalayan Library - THL

THL Title Text
Tibetan Buddhism at Wutai Shan in the Qing
Gray Tuttle, Columbia University
JIATS, no. 6 (December 2011), THL #T5721, pp. 163-214
Section 9 of 10 (pp. 192-194)

Appendix 2: Prominent Tibetan Buddhists at Wutai shan in the Shunzhi and Kangxi Reigns

Awang Laozang (Ngawang Lozangngag dbang blo bzang, 1601-1687)

  • Probably a Mongol. Alias: Elder of Clear and Cool Mountain (Qingliang laoren); surname Jia (賈).
  • From Yanjing’s (Beijing) Western Hills (Xishan), at ten years old he sent to Chongguo Si. Understood Tibetan and Chinese scriptures at a glance.
  • 1653: received vows from the Fifth Dalai Lama along with five others: “one among will head Mount Wutai.”
  • 1659: sent to preside over (shang zhu) Mount Wutai, took charge (zong li) of Tibetan and Chinese affairs. Did ceremonies for dynasty’s prosperity.134
  • 1683: Kangxi gave him the name Elder of Clear and Cool Mountain (Qingliang laoren).135
  • [page 193]
  • 1687: stūpa erected in his honor at Wutai shan.136

Lobsang Danjin (Lozang Tendzinblo bzang bstan ’dzin)

  • Mongol who wrote first Mongolian language gazetteer of Wutai shan at behest of Awang Laozang, blocks carved at Pusa Ding.137

Laozang Danbei [Jiancan] (Lozang Tenpé [Gyentsen]blo bzang bstan pa[’i rgyal mtshan], 1632-1684)138

  • Mongolian, registered (with a guard, Wei) as surname Zhao (趙).
  • Resident-at-capital preceptor (zhu jing shi), teacher of ceremony (li shi) at Chongguo Si.
  • Lived at Mount Wutai’s Zhong Ding (Pusa Ding) and Luohuo Si for several years.
  • Travelled to Tibetan and Mongolian countries (guo).
  • 1659: Made abbot of Wutai shan.
  • 1671: “Protected men and heaven.”
  • 1684: In capital in relation to roof-tile upgrade; died at Chongguo Si.
  • 1685: His disciple, Danba, was involved with his stūpa inscription.139

[Laozang] Danba [Gelong] (Lozang Tenpa Gelongblo bzang bstan pa dge slong)

  • Alias Qingxiu chanshi. From Shandong, Laizhou.140
  • Disciple of Laozang Danbei.141
  • Put in charge of Wutai shan after Awang Laozang died (1687).142
  • In position of power at Wutai shan until at least 1701.
  • 1701 wrote Preface and Conclusion (“Record of the Renovations of Wutai shan Jenrong Yuan”) to New Clear and Cool Mountain Gazetteer.143

Dingzing Jiancuo (Tendzin Gyatsobstan ’dzin rgya mtsho)

  • In position of power at Wutai shan from 1704-1714.144

[page 194]

Lozang ChömpelBlo bzang chos ’phel

  • Jasagh Lama of Pusa Ding (sometime between 1715-1736).145

[134] Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi (1701), volume 7, 21b-24a.
[135] “Qingdai lama jiao beike lu,” 246-48. Also, Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi (1701), volume 10, 17b; Dznyana ShrimanDznyā na shrī man, Riwo Tsengé Karchak Rapsel MelongRi bo rtse lnga’i dkar chag rab gsal me long, 131; Heissig, Die Pekinger lamaistischen Blockdrucke, 12.
[136] “Qingdai lama jiao beike lu,” in Qing zhengfu yu lama jiao, edited by Xixin Zhang (Lhasa: Xizang renmin chubanshe, 1988), 246-48. This texts was preserved in Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi (1701), volume 7, 21b-26b.
[137] Farquhar, “Emperor as Bodhisattva,” 30.
[138] This Tibetan spelling is found in Dznyana ShrimanDznyā na shrī man, Riwo Tsengé Karchak Rapsel MelongRi bo rtse lnga’i dkar chag rab gsal me long, 135: “Jasagh LamaBlo bzang bstan pa.”
[139] “Qingdai lama jiao beike lu,” 243-45. Also, Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi(1701), volume 10, 17b (Shandong origins).
[140] Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi (1701), volume 10, 17b. See also the many entries which mention him in Yen-ching Library’s Wang Benzhi, ed., Qingliang shan jiyao (post-1780), first volume, 67a-69a.
[141] “Qingdai lama jiao beike lu,” 244.
[142] Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi (1701), volume 2, 10a. Or in 1682, see Köhle, “Why Did the Kangxi Emperor Go to Wutai Shan?” n. 24.
[143] Gest Library’s Qingliang shan xinzhi (1701), volume 10, 17b-20a.
[144] Köhle, “Why Did the Kangxi Emperor Go to Wutai Shan?” n. 24.
[145] Köhle, “Why Did the Kangxi Emperor Go to Wutai Shan?” n. 24.

Note Citation for Page

Gray Tuttle, “Tibetan Buddhism at Wutai Shan in the Qing: The Chinese-language Register,” Journal of the International Association of Tibetan Studies, no. 6 (December 2011): , http://www.thlib.org?tid=T5721 (accessed ).

Note Citation for Whole Article

Gray Tuttle, “Tibetan Buddhism at Wutai Shan in the Qing: The Chinese-language Register,” Journal of the International Association of Tibetan Studies, no. 6 (December 2011): 163-214, http://www.thlib.org?tid=T5721 (accessed ).

Bibliography Citation

Tuttle, Gray. “Tibetan Buddhism at Wutai Shan in the Qing: The Chinese-language Register.” Journal of the International Association of Tibetan Studies, no. 6 (December 2011): 163-214. http://www.thlib.org?tid=T5721 (accessed ).