Tibetan and Himalayan Library - THL

THL Title Text
by John Vincent Bellezza
Edited by Geoffrey Barstow, Mickey Stockwell and Michael White
Tibetan & Himalayan Library
Published under the THL Digital Text License.

II.1. Stelae and accompanying structures: Funerary and non-funerary structures

Marbuk DoringDmar sbug rdo ring

Basic site data

  • Site name: Marbuk DoringDmar sbug rdo ring
  • English equivalent: Red Nook Long-stones
  • Site number: C-108
  • Site typology: II.1b, II.2b
  • Elevation: 4640 m
  • Administrative location (township): ChönkhorChos ’khor
  • Administrative location (county): Drongpa’Brong pa
  • Survey expedition: HTCE
  • Survey date: April 27, 2002
  • Contemporary usage: Light grazing.
  • Identifiable Buddhist constructions: None.
  • Maps: UTRS XI, HAS C6
  • View Place Dictionary Entry
  • View Sites Images

General site characteristics

Marbuk DoringDmar sbug rdo ring is located at the foot of a ridge that bounds the west margin of the TsachuTshwa chu basin. The site enjoys good views in all directions but the west. The terrain is level and covered in sparse turf and small brush. The site consists of 11 in situ pillars erected inside an enclosure and what appears to be a large funerary superstructure. All the pillars of Marbuk DoringDmar sbug rdo ring are made of the same type of gray rock. They are heavily eroded and host orange climax lichen.

Oral tradition

In this region (Drongpa’Brong pa), sites such as Marbuk DoringDmar sbug rdo ring are commonly associated with the primordial epoch and the MönMon tribe of ancient times.

Site elements

Enclosure

Only the east corner of the enclosure is intact. The enclosure appears to have been oriented in the intermediate points. The remaining wall fragment is of standard construction: a double-course (60 cm thick) structure composed of variable-length blocky stones (20 cm to 40 cm), which are either flush with the ground or which protrude slightly above the surface. The east corner of the enclosure is located 9 m from the row of pillars. The line of pillars stretches out over 3.2 m. The enclosure must have been somewhat wider than this. The ground that was situated inside the enclosure appears to have undergone significant geomorphologic changes and is now sloping.

Pillars

The four-sided specimens are very consistent, giving the impression that they may have been hewn into shape. The pillars form a U-shaped array. The eight pillars of the main row form a line near where the northwest wall of the enclosure must have existed. From southwest to northeast the pillars have the following dimensions and forms:

  1. Long-stone DR1: four-sided, broken (40 cm [height] by 80 cm [basal girth]). This specimen is offset from the main row of pillars and probably stands in close proximity to what must have been the southwest wall of the enclosure.
  2. Long-stone DR2: four-sided (60 cm by 70 cm).
  3. Long-stone DR3: four-sided (75 cm by 60 cm).
  4. Long-stone DR4: four-sided (1.3 m by 75 cm).
  5. Long-stone DR5: tabular (60 cm by 75 cm).
  6. Long-stone DR6: four-sided (80 cm by 75 cm).
  7. Long-stone DR7: four-sided (65 cm by 70 cm).
  8. Long-stone DR8: tabular (90 cm by 90 cm).
  9. Long-stone DR9: irregularly shaped (90 cm by 75 cm).
  10. Long-stone DR10: four-sided (60 cm by 1 m). This specimen is offset from the main row of pillars and probably stands in close proximity to what must have been the northeast wall of the enclosure.
  11. Long-stone DR11: tabular, broken (40 cm by 75 cm). This specimen is offset from the main row of pillars and probably stands in close proximity to what must have been the northeast wall of the enclosure. There is a collapsed pillar (65 cm long) near what must have been the northeast wall of the enclosure.
Outlying funerary structure

What appear to be the vestiges of a large funerary enclosure are located 28 m south of the pillars. The remaining U-shaped double-course wall fragment is 48 m long and perhaps 50 cm thick. The highly eroded, blocky stones in this wall are primarily 20 cm to 40 cm in length. The space enclosed by the wall gently slopes down to the east. A ravine now cuts through the base of the U-shaped structure, dislodging some of the stones.

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Note Citation for Page

John Vincent Bellezza, (Charlottesville, VA: Tibetan & Himalayan Library, 2010), .

Bibliographic Citation

John Vincent Bellezza. . Charlottesville, VA: Tibetan & Himalayan Library, 2010.